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Pulling Your Hair Out: Conversations About The Writing Process

TV writer Richard Lowe talks with writers about how they write and what drives them to pull their hair out. (New episodes coming April 2019!)
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Apr 24, 2019

Margot Ye is a South Florida native and first-generation Chinese-American. She spent her childhood dodging piano practice, daydreaming at the pool, and swimming against the current of her large extended family. Putting her best practical foot forward, Margot left her hometown to pursue a business degree from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. There she quickly realized that finance and accounting were not her calling, but the industry of film and television beckoned. After working at a talent agency, production company, and post house, Margot studied the craft of storytelling at UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Margot’s short film OUT OF THE BLUE earned a DGA Student Film Award, LACMA’s Young Director Art of Film Award, and three UCLA Spotlight Awards for Best Narrative, Best Screenplay, and Best Visual Design.

Following grad school, Margot got a glimpse of the start-up life while producing content for media-tech companies such as Hulu, Google, Niantic, and Headspace. With enough stories to fill a fake Twitter feed, Margot left the tech sphere to focus on writing for television. Last year, Margot was selected for NBC’s Writers on the Verge fellowship, and she hasn’t looked back. She continues to daydream every chance she can get, but now she commits those dreams to script.

"I have thought to myself, 'Okay, tomorrow you're going to sit and write at your desk for three hours,' and if I plant that idea in my head, it helps. I think of it as an appointment with my desk."

• Margot on Facebook

• Margot on Instagram

 

// Pulling Your Hair Out is produced and hosted by Richard Lowe. Music by Joshua Moshier.